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TRUE TALES: Duke

I have owned more than a handful of dogs and have prepared many foster dogs for adoption.  Along the way, I have met some interesting and challenging canines.  One such dog was Duke, The Found Hound.   I was buying groceries at the Food Lion in Bridgeton.  Every time the door opened, this large, bony tick-ridden hound walked in sweeping his tail from side to side.  He entered the store three times and each time he was forced back outside.  After the third time, the store employees were ready to call Animal Control.  It was Thanksgiving week, and I figured the fate of this dog in the hands of Animal Control would not have a good outcome. 

In the parking lot, the dog was going up to everyone in the same friendly manner that he showed as he entered the Food Lion.  Everyone brushed him off –that is, everyone but me.  I saw something in him that I liked.  No one knew anything about this dog so I considered him abandoned.  It was clear by looking at him that he hadn’t been well cared for.  He was severely underweight and his coat was in poor condition.   

My Found Hound: Duke

I asked some people to help me get him into the backseat of my car.  They asked me what I was going to do with him, and I said I’d adopt him out or keep him.  They looked at me like I was crazy.  My intentions were to get him fully vetted, neutered, trained in some basic obedience, and then adopt him out through the humane society.  After I got home, I named him Duke, and started his rehabilitation.  He impressed me with his intelligence, athleticism, and willingness to learn.  I worked on calming his reactiveness to other dogs, eliminating his food aggressive issues, and taught him basic skills and house manners.  When he was ready, I took him to an adoptathon.  To my dismay, he was ignored because he was too big. Everyone passed us to view the little dogs.  I decided that no one would ever do that to him again and took him “home.”  He was mine!

This dog that no one wanted went on to receive a Canine Good Citizenship certificate, had a blast learning agility, and excelled at obedience.  He remained my faithful companion for eight years.  To this day, he holds the title of being the most frustrating and challenging dog I’ve owned.  But he also taught me the most and took me to places I never would have gone.  For that, I am forever grateful.     

If you have a dog that is a challenge, we may be able to help.  We’d love to improve the outcome of your story.  Contact us so we can all hear it.

DID YOU KNOW? – We can Walk & Train Your Pet

DID YOU KNOW? – We can Walk & Train Your Pet

Jeanne Walk & Train Gale

Quarantine has been a boon for pet shelters. Many people have found that adding a dog or cat to their household relieves boredom and loneliness during Covid-19. The challenge with having a new pet is that your training options are limited since in person obedience classes for dogs are on hold. And cats, being cats, need special one-on-one training to make them good family pets. While there are lots of books and online tutorials, with everything going on at home, pet training may be necessary but it can be low on the to-do list and that can have negative consequences.

Free Free Dog Behavior Training Professional

If you have a dog that likes to jump up on people, pull on their leash, and misbehave around other canines, Crockett’s Critter Care now offers Walk &Train.  In addition to walking your pooch for exercise, potty breaks, and mental stimulus – we will include Fear Free better behavior training to address common pet concerns.  While you’re taking care of your children, attending to Zoom meetings or conference calls, we can give you a break and your pup the attention it needs to be a charming companion.

Jeanne Crockett recently achieved Fear Free Elite Status which she earned after three years of Fear Free Training. Fear Free promotes awareness of the animal’s emotional welfare.  Fear Free professionals are trained to recognize and alleviate fear, anxiety, and stress in pets. Through calming techniques and gentle guidance things like giving medication, trimming nails, and visiting the vet can become hassle-free happy experiences.

These techniques work with cats as well as dogs. Click the links to learn more about Walk &Train and the Fear Free methods on our website, or call Jeanne at (252) 635-2655 to see how she can help you have a harmonious household.


Happy Pet! Happy Home!

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Do You Give Your Dog Choices?

Do You Give Your Dog Choices?

I’ve been involved in several discussions lately with “dog” people about the importance of giving dogs choices.  For example, Davy and I attend classes with a local trainer.  During a recent training session, each handler was asked to enter the ring alone, remove the dog’s leash, and walk away from their dog.  When it was our turn, Davy watched for a few seconds and then bounded to catch up.  I proceeded to change pace (normal, slow, fast) and make many quick changes of direction.  I was so proud of Davy as he showed great interest and enthusiasm to keep pace with me. He happily and eagerly did what I asked with each maneuver.  He read my “cues” and fell into place with ease.

This class consists of pet owners who are actively involved in showing their dogs in agility, rally, and obedience; performing in dog sports like barn hunts and dock diving; and training their dogs in scent work.  The dog participants ranged in age from puppies to seniors and include Border Collies, Golden Retrievers, Dobermans, Aussies, Cattle Dogs, Cavaliers, and German Shepherds.  We all took our turn.  Some of the dogs were a little unsure at first and wandered off to sniff a bit – but once they figured it out, I could see their confidence rise, their energy level pick-up, and their tails wag.  I have to admit, it was a nice break from sit, stay, down, left, right, about, and heel.  Most importantly – it was fun!

So I began to think of other ways to give my dog choices and started to set up little problems for Davy to solve.  Instead of dictating the direction of our walks, I started to ask Davy, “Which way?”  As long as his choice was safe, I followed his lead.  What this is doing is letting it be his walk.  He gets to add his own input which makes him feel more in charge.  After all, who wants someone dictating their every move?              

At home, we play the “Find It” game – especially on rainy days.  I ask him to sit, show him a toy, hide it in a place where he can’t see it, and then ask him to Find It.  But now, I ask him to select the toy from a few toys that I bring out for the game.  It’s one more choice that he gets to make.  Then for a treat – he gets to choose the one from my right hand or my left.

Pick a ball… any ball

Davy loves to play fetch in the yard.  What started with one ball has increased to three – a sturdy Kong ball, a lightweight whiffle ball, and a bouncy La Crosse ball.  Davy gets to choose the ball he wants me to throw, and he gets to choose when I throw it.  He knows that he must be in a sit before I put the ball in play.  He’s good at making the right choice.

At night, Davy is able to select his sleeping spot.  He can choose from several dog beds, the couch or my bed. Interesting that his choice is not always the same.  He’ll come up on the bed when I am reading or watching TV, but leaves when I turn out the lights. Then his preference is his doggie bed on the floor.  During the day, he is more likely to be found resting on the couch.  I like to give Davy choices.  I think it enriches his world to be able to have a say.  It breaks up the routine, builds confidence, and instills in him a happy working attitude.  It also helps to create a better relationship between us.  Letting your dog make the right choices is the key to success.  Next time you are paying attention to your dog, give him a chance to make some of the decisions.  You’ll be pleasantly surprised at the outcome.