Get Ready! The Holidays are Coming

Your homelife is usually quiet and routine but from the end of October with the arrival of Halloween until the doldrums of January 2 set in, things are not normal. When the doorbell rings, it puts your pet on the alert that something possibly wicked is coming their way. All the holidays offer strange scents, sights, and sounds that may unnerve your usually calm pet.  You need to take special precautions during the holiday season to keep your pet and your household on an even keel.

Intriguing Decorations

As you put out your holiday décor your pet may find it interesting, tasty, or worth demolishing. Best to let your pets sniff, see, and smell the decorations first.  As you add these unusual pieces around the house, consider that they can pose a health hazard to your furry friend. They may get tangled in the lights, devour the potpourri, or trash your special crystal. Take a pet’s eye view of the things you are displaying to keep your treasures and pets safe.  And, If you are going to dress up Fido or Fluffy – chose a comfortable outfit and give them time to get used to it. 

Threatening Strangers

Droves of people coming to the door for your special event can make your pet anxious. They want to know who is entering your kingdom, if they are a friend or foe, and then act accordingly. If your dog is growling or exuberantly leaping to welcome your visitors, your guests will be uncomfortable. And remember, if you are busy answering the door, your pets may take advantage of the unguarded opening and make a dash for the outdoors. Save your pets (and your friendships) by providing a quiet and secure crate or room for them while you handle the crowd. Provide treats, toys, and a comfy spot for your fur babies so that they can peacefully enjoy your event. Both your pets and guests will appreciate having their own space.  

Festive Food

Chocolate is a food group for many humans but deadly for dogs; as is any candy containing xylitol. Keep all the human food out of reach and under close scrutiny while preparing for your party so that your pets are not tempted by something delectable but harmful for them. You certainly don’t want your pup parking his cookies in the dining room after slurping some milk and eating a few grapes. Be careful about the plants in your home, as well; the ASPCA has a list of plants that are toxic for pets.

Planning ahead and seeing the world through your pet’s eyes will ensure everyone has a safe and happy holiday season.