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DID YOU KNOW? – K-9 Nibbles

DID YOU KNOW? – K-9 Nibbles

Crockett’s Pet Project for 2020 is the Craven County Sheriff’s K-9 Unit. Our goal is to help raise funds for their needs. We rate them as Five Paws Up.

Police Dogs: “Just the facts, Ma’am.”

  • They identify by scent first, then voice, then by silhouette.
  • A dog’s sense of smell is 200-400 times stronger than a human. A bloodhound can smell a human buried 12 feet underground and can sometimes follow a scent of a missing person weeks later
  • Police Dogs serve from six to nine years.
  • German shepherds can search an area four times faster than a human
  • K-9s can sniff out a car in three minutes.
  • A K-9 is trained to bite and hold – not to chew or release quickly.
  • Potential K-9s don’t start training until they are between 12 and 15 months of age.

Craven County Sheriff’s Unit K-9 Unit

Sheriff Hughes and his department have been resourceful in building this unit and our community has been wonderful in giving donations.  It usually costs around $15,000 to buy and train a police dog. Our police dogs were donated or brought in from other departments.  They are:

K-9 Rhys
  • K-9 Ghost – Belgian Malinois
  • K-9 Ringo – Belgian Malinois
  • K-9 Stihl – Belgian Malinois
  • K-9 Nibbles – Pit Bull
  • K-9 Rhys – Bloodhound

K-9 Nibbles was rescued in 2015 from a suspected dog-fighting ring in Ontario Canada. He came to us by way of an organization in Philadelphia, PA, called Throw Away Dogs who specializes in rehabilitating and training dogs for law enforcement.

K-9 Rhys was donated from a nonprofit organization called Highland Canine Connect from Harmony, NC.

Every month the K-9 Team with the most illegal narcotics taken off the streets is awarded “Top Dog of the Month.”

According to Sheriff Hughes, our K9 program is an essential part of our fight against illegal narcotics being sold and trafficked in our county.

Learn more about our K-9s by viewing their very own FB page: Craven County Sheriff’s Office – K-9 Unit.

Donations in any amount are appreciated. You can mail your check to the Craven County Sheriff’s Office, 1100 Clarks Road, New Bern, NC 28562, and in the memo section, add Sheriff’s K-9 Unit. Your donation will make our county even safer.


For Fear Free professional pet sitting and dog walking, contact Jeanne Crockett, owner of Crockett’s Critter Care.

Happy Pet! Happy Home!

Get more pro tips to take care of your pets by subscribing to our newsletter and blog.

Meet and Greet

Meet and Greet

It’s Nice to Meet You!

At Crockett’s Critter Care, our first meeting is a chance for us to get to know your pet and your expectations. Taking the time to introduce your pet to our sitters is the foundation for establishing a positive relationship. Together we’ll talk about your pet’s personality and needs. We will discuss your pet’s health and what we can do to support it. Then together, we’ll create a schedule that will work for you and your pet so that you have a happy home.

Shy Cats and Fearful Dogs

We enter quietly (without ringing doorbells) and usually let your pet come to us with little fanfare. It is a time for us to observe whether your pet is friendly or fearful with strangers. We many not look at your pet or lure it toward us if it is frightened. We respect your pet’s space.

We are concerned with your pet’s physical and emotional well-being. We don’t force ourselves on your pet. We let your pet approach us when it is ready. We are trained to understand your pets’ body language and we adjust our behavior accordingly.

To show we’re friendly and safe, we may toss a few high value treats (the good stuff) to create a positive association with us. We want your dogs to approach us with happy tail wags and your cats with contented purrs when we come to visit.

With patience, gentleness, and the right approach we believe that we will win your pet over. We move slowly, speak softly, and allow your pet to choose us. Some pets love us immediately and some need time and distance to build trust. We don’t rush this introductory phase. We are in it for the long haul and hope that our first meeting is the beginning of a long and happy relationship with each pet and its owner.

Here kitty, kitty…

Shy white cat

If you cat is hiding when we arrive for our client meeting, let it stay where it is. Don’t try to pick it up and bring it out to meet us. It is hiding to avoid us because it is afraid. We are fine with that. Many of these cats will come up to us in their own time. Meanwhile, on our kitty visits, we will make sure your cat is healthy, eating, drinking water, and using the litter box appropriately. We like to do a head count to make sure no one is stuck in a closet.

For shy cats in hiding, we will sit in a safe spot and read out loud or just talk to your cat softly. We may continue to toss a yummy treat its way. We have pheromones that we can spray on your cat’s bedding and a music cube that plays calming music that we can leave behind to alleviate your pet’s anxieties. Many of our clients are amazed at the pictures we send of their scared cat or fearful dog relaxing in close proximity to us.

Surpassing Expectations

Our initial meet and greet is a courtesy visit to determine if we can meet your expectations and your pet’s needs.

Once we’ve determined that Crockett’s Critter Care can provide the care your pet needs on the schedule you require we’ll set up our visit plan. And we take the time to learn where all the pet supplies are so we aren’t perceived as cat burglars by your protective pet. We need to know where the treats, leash, and cleaning supplies are located so that we can safely and confidently care for your pet.

Professional Pet Sitter

Crockett’s Critter Care pet sitters are trained in pet first aid/CPR and receive ongoing education in our field. Our experience, training, and knowledge make us the professional choice for caring for your pet when you need a pet sitter or a dog walker. Jeanne Crockett, the owner of Crockett’s Critter Care, was chosen as Pet Sitter International’s 2020 Pet Sitter of the Year. This honor was judged on providing pet sitting excellence, adherence to superior business ethics and standards, and outstanding contributions to the industry and local community.

Let us introduce ourselves to you and your pet. We’re here to care for finned, feathered, and furry critters as if they were our own.

For Fear Free professional pet sitting and dog walking, contact Jeanne Crockett, owner of Crockett’s Critter Care.

Happy Pet! Happy Home!

Get more pro tips to take care of your pets by subscribing to our newsletter and blog.

DID YOU KNOW? You Need Hurricane Prep for Your Pets

DID YOU KNOW? You Need Hurricane Prep for Your Pets

How prepared are you?  A little, a lot, gone overboard, never crossed your mind?  North Carolina is no stranger to hurricanes so that will be my focus today.

Here are some things to think about:  the internet and tv may go down; power may go out; rain may cause floods; wind may cause damage; evacuations may be ordered.  Everyone is under a lot of stress scrambling to get what they need to survive and protect their belongings.

Make a plan for your pet ahead of time:  decide where they will go, how they will get there, what supplies and records you will take, and know what you can do to help keep them calm.

Prepare an emergency kit for each animal.  Take water, food, can opener, carriers or crates, litter box and litter, puppy pads, plastic bags, pickup bags, medicine, medical records, leash, collar, harness, pet photo, ID tags.  Suggestion:  take paper records and a photo.  While you may have excellent records and pictures on your smartphone, you may not be able to access them.  Store paper reports in a waterproof container (zip lock bags are handy) and take them with you.  You may also scan records and photos to a file and email the file to a friend or family member who lives in a safe area. 

Before the bad weather approaches, bring your pets inside.  Keep them safe.  You don’t want to search for a terrified pet that has escaped from the yard.

Stay calm – your pets are sensitive to your feelings.  You can help them stay relaxed by packing their favorite blanket or toy, bringing a long-lasting chew toy, spraying Feliway (cats) or Adaptil (dogs) on bedding or towels that can be put into their carriers or crates. 

If your pet is not familiar with going into carriers or crates – teach them to love them.  Leave them up in the house, toss treats in them, feed them next to them and gradually move the food inside.  If they have to spend time confined in one, they will be more comfortable if they have a good association with them. 

Stay tuned in to the weather reports and, if you have to leave – don’t dilly dally.  You are your pet’s best guardian so plan to take them with you. 

Good luck and stay safe.

For Fear Free professional pet sitting and dog walking, contact Jeanne Crockett, owner of Crockett’s Critter Care.

Happy Pet! Happy Home!

Get more pro tips to take care of your pets by subscribing to our newsletter and blog.

Summertime Pet Adventures

Summertime Pet Adventures

One thing I love about summertime – the days are longer. That means I can take my dogs out for an early morning and late evening walk when the temperatures may be a little cooler and the daylight is stretched to the limit. It’s good for them and for me. There are more hours to explore new places. I know people who take their dogs to the beach or the river on a nice day.

Park Place

I have found a new place close by to explore. It’s the Martin Marietta Park in New Bern. It’s still being developed and, sometimes, Davy and I have the park all to ourselves. Progress is being made with the boat ramp, restrooms and more. When this park is complete, it will have about 850 acres with activities for adults, children, and pets with forest, lake and river views. For now, even in the early phase of its development, it is pet-approved by Davy.

There is a 3.2 mile park loop that allows dogs on leash. Davy loves the exercise and the opportunities to sniff and smell. I love a good outing and the chance to see birds that I don’t get in my backyard. I can’t wait to see the birding activity that the fall migration will bring.

Short Leash = Safe Dog

When we are walking in the neighborhood, we spot a lot of squirrels, bunny rabbits, baby birds, and an occasional possum, or deer. I keep Davy’s leash short so he doesn’t have a snake encounter (they are out now too); I want to see exactly what is in front of his nose. My neighbor’s dog was frolicking in the park when she heard a yelp followed by her dog limping toward her. It turned out to be from a snake bite. If you have ever seen a dog swollen and whining in pain from a snake bite, you will think twice about letting your pup get too far ahead of you on the trails. A vet visit, pain meds, antibiotics, and time allowed her pup to fully recover.

On the Road…

Car rides are fun – now that they don’t always end up in the vet parking lot. Davy is happy to jump into his crate in the back of the SUV. An interesting side note: He knows by the direction I turn the car where he is likely to end up. When I drive him to school, he faces the back window; when we go to the park, he faces the front window. I can tell that he is happier going to the park!

Curious Kitties

Cats enjoy the summer too. They gravitate to their perch to watch the birds come to the feeder. Many of my clients have their feeders lined up with their cat trees by a window so the cats can get a bird’s eye view. Cats also love to find a sunny spot to snooze and summer provides them with comfy rays of sunshine almost every day. Kitties love to climb on the screen by the open window to get as close as they can to the flowers, animals, and scents on the other side.

Bird’s Eye View

I have a few clients who place their bird’s cage on the porch or patio on nice days so their birds can enjoy the scenery and the sun. I imagine that it feels good to a parrot, cockatiel, parakeet, and conure to have some wind under their wings and to hear our yard birds up close.

Staycations

Your caged pets like bunnies, hamsters, gerbils, lizards, and your indoor cats are best left inside to stay out of harm’s way. They can have a fully enriched indoor space with toys, perches, hiding places, boxes and games where they can play in a safe and healthy environment.

Summer affords us a lot of extra daylight and nice warm temperatures to enjoy with our pets both inside and outside.

DID YOU KNOW? Seven Summer Safety Tips for Dogs

DID YOU KNOW? Seven Summer Safety Tips for Dogs

Here are the essential things that you can do to keep your pet safe during the heat of the summer.  
1.  Learn the early signs of heat exhaustion: 

  • Excessive panting
  • Excessive or thick drool
  • Reddened tongue, inside ears
  • Red or pale gums
  • Glassy and/or red eyes
  • Anxiousness or restlessness
  • Reluctance or refusal to go on

2.  Shorter, slow outings at cooler times of the day are safer!
Exercise in small doses in the early morning or as the sun sets.

3.  Test the surface of the asphalt for three seconds: 
It’s too hot to touch with your hand, it’s too hot for paws.

4.  Provide room temperature water for your dog to drink

  • Bring it with you when you go outdoors
  • Give your dog plenty of chances to quench his thirst
  • Be sure the water bowl is always fresh and full at home, too

6.  Minimize sun exposure
Apply sunscreen made for dogs if needed.

7.  High humidity = Low Activity

  •  Find some shade, take a seat, and relax
  •  High humidity makes it harder to keep cool 

We believe that dogs need to get their paws on the ground for an adventure outside of the house. When you are unable to walk your pet yourself, our trained team of professionals is ready to step in and stroll. Let us help keep your pets happier and healthier.

For Fear Free professional pet sitting and dog walking, contact Jeanne Crockett, owner of Crockett’s Critter Care.

Happy Pet! Happy Home!

JULY IS NATIONAL LOST PET PREVENTION MONTH

JULY IS NATIONAL LOST PET PREVENTION MONTH

A family pet is lost every 2 seconds in North America

I am that person who hangs up signs in my neighborhood for lost and found pets, posts photos on NextDoor of strange dogs that I see wandering around, and share posts on my Facebook page for local pets whose owners are looking for them. 

I have joined in pet search parties, have helped owners get kitties in distress down from high perches in trees, and have placed white erase boards with other people’s missing pet information on my front lawn.  July has the distinction of having the largest number of pets go missing because of the Independence Day celebrations.

Fireworks are very scary for pets.  Some tremble in fear even when they are safe in the house, some escape from their yard in terror, and some bolt right out the front door into the thick of it.  All have been petrified. Some are picked up by animal control.  Some come home injured. Unfortunately, some never come home.  My research reveals that a family pet is lost every 2 seconds in North America, 10 million pets are lost every year, 1 out of 3 pets will be lost in their lifetime and not just due to fireworks. 

BE PROACTIVE

Original artwork by Kate Goodman

You must be proactive to keep your furry friends safe at home. Start by microchipping. In case you get separated from your pet, the chip will connect them back to you. Be sure to pet-proof your house and property so that they don’t wander without you.  That means walking your yard to look for holes that have been dug under fences or gaps in the fence that your critter can scoot through. Also be sure the gate latches and closes securely.  

Inside the house, check doors, screens, and windows to ensure that they don’t provide an accidental escape route. Cats can be very dexterous about pulling at screens to open them up just enough to slip outside. Windows are better closed so curious cats aren’t given the chance to try out their hunting skills. 

USE A LEASH

Crockett’s Critter Care team members always check the fit of the collar or to ensure the pet can’t slip out or back out of it.  As a rule, extension leashes are not used as they don’t allow for proper control of the pet and they don’t protect them from sniffing out hidden dangers like snakes.  If a dog pulls or lunges after squirrels, birds, rabbits, or other perceived prey, we suggest using two leashes, just to be safe.

Original artwork by Kate Goodman

CRATED PETS

Remove your dog’s collar before they are placed in the crate.  It is a standard practice in the veterinarian’s office as a dog can be injured or worse if their collar is caught and they struggled to get free.  When your pet is crated, secure all the latches so they can’t escape.

TRAVEL SAFELY

Secure your pet while riding in the car, just as you would any other passenger. Crating your pet allows them their own space while traveling and provides assurance if you are in an accident that they won’t be ejected or run off in fright.   

Following these simple tips, staying aware of your pet, and being proactive is the best way to keep your pet safely with you and not a statistic or featured on a lost pet poster. If you need other suggestions for pet safety whether they are furry, feathered, or finned give me a call or send me an email.  I am ready to help!